abstract embroidery – untitled

another abstract piece, designed as wall hanging, that emerged from working on my first piece, topography. march 2021.

plant dyed vintage cotton embroidery thread (tagetes, onion skin, tagetes/onionskn mix, sequoia cones, pine cone mix) on antique, hand woven linen from austria.

mount hand turned by @orcoyoyo from willow wood (salix); string hand twined from leftover thread i used during the dyeing process to secure the skeins of thread in the dyepot.

dyeing with onion skins

what you will need:
– onion skins (i used yellow ones here, but of course red ones or a mix of red and brown work just fine); i ususally collect all onion skins when cooking and store them in a paper bag. only use the dry, yellow/red parts, no fleshy bits, as they would start to rot and smell.
– a cooking pot large enough to hold your fabric or thread to be able to move around freely
– a colander or strainer of some sorts to strain off the onion skins once the dye has been extracted
– a muslin cloth or any other cloth to strain out fine particles – a tea towel works fine. just make sure it’s okay to dye/discolour that piece of fabric.
– wooden spoon or something else to stir – may also discolour in the process
– gloves – not really necessary; but if you want to make 100% sure not any tiny bit of yellowish colour stays on your skin, use gloves. i never do with onion dye, though.
– fabric or thread for dyeing (any animal fiber or natural fiber will work; i usually dye cotton or linen or a cotton/linen mix and don’t have much experience with animal fiber like wool and silk; they take colour beautifully, though). in this example i’m dyeing cotton embroidery thread.

to prepare beforehand – scouring your fabric/thread (speaking about cotton and linen here, this guide is not for silk or wool!!!)
in order to prepare the fiber to take up the dye as best as possible, you need to remove all possible dirt, dust, grease, … even newly bought fabric or thread has residue from spinning and weaving that you need to remove.
for fabric, wash accordingly, and then there are two options:
– either machine wash at 95° celsius with baking soda
– or (especially small pieces or small amounts) put in a pot with water and baking soda and bring to a boil, then simmer for appr. one hour. strain off the water (you will now see how much residue will have come out by the colour of the water) and rinse thoroughly until the water runs clear.

for scouring thread i always use the “simmer in a pot” method. roll the thread into a loose loop and secure it losely so it doesn’t fall apart and tangles up. tie up in one or more places, but keep it lose enough, so you don’t accidentally create a part that can’t take up the dye (this would be called a resist dye technique, which in case you want to create unevenly dyed thread is a nice technique; just don’t do this by accident). when stirring, do so very gently and try not to tangle up the thread too much.

if you dry your material after scouring and before dyeing, make sure to pre-wet it before it goes into the dye pot.

extracting the dye:
put all the collected onion skins into your pot and cover with water.

put the pot on the stove and bring the water to a boil. once it has heated up, keep it simmering for at least half an hour. depending on what you want to achieve, use more or less onion skins and let it simmer a bit longer or shorter. the more skins, the more intense your dye will get. keeping the heat below a boil will bring out more of the yellow tones, boiling it will shift the colour more towards orange/rust in brown onion skins. you’ll see the colour of your dye bath change pretty quickly, the skins give off colour quite easily.

once you have extracted the dye, strain off the skins by using a colander/sieve/strainer lined with muslin cloth. make sure to squeeze out all the dye still left in the skins. pour your dye back into the pot.

dyeing:
now you’re ready to dye your fabric or thread. for dyeing with onion skin you don’t need to mordant your fabric beforehand, which makes it really easy and quick. take your previously scoured fabric or thread (make sure it’s wet before it goes into the dye pot – soaking longer is better, wetting it quickly is better than dry) and put it into the dye. now start heating the dye up and bring it to a simmer. let it simmer for half an hour or hour – check the colour of your fabric or thread. stir gently to move the material around so the dye can spread more evenly. you can let the material sit in the dye bath over night after it has cooled down. or take it out earlier, if you like the colour. just take into account that the colour looks more intense when it’s still wet and not yet rinsed. once you like the colour, take out your material and wring it out. hang to dry. i usually wait a few days up to two weeks before i rinse out excess dye. it helps the dye stick to the fiber a bit better. but if you’re too curious to wait, rinse right away until the water runs clear and hang up to dry.

you can use the dye bath more than once, until you have used up all colour. if i want to re-use it, but not right away, i pour it into strage jars with a screw lid when it’s still hot (put a wet towel under the glass container, so they don’t break from the heat; and best put them into your sink when pouring, so even if they break you don’t mess up your whole kitchen), screw the lid on and the jars will seal themselves shut when cooling down. this way you can store your dye for a few weeks before re-using.

here is a skein of onion dyed embroidery thread – already dried, but not yet rinsed. look at those wonderful orange-red-rusty tones!

it is a very straightforward dye made out of food waste, so give it a go – it’s fun and really easy. the tones you get are always beautiful.

i’m happy to answer questions, just leave me a message right here. and also do let me know if you tried out dyeing with onion skins, i’d be happy to see your results!

antique linen scarf

usually i do work on several projects at the same time. i have always worked like this, it’s the same with books – never just one.

so, one of my current long term projects is an antique linen scarf. it used to be a pillow case which i took apart. the linen is of a beautiful quality, handwoven, a wonderful linen sheen, drapes really nicely. it is has also thinned out a lot, it’s around 100 years old after all.

originally i wanted to keep it white and visibly mend all the worn out areas with vintage buttonhole silk. i did do a few of those mends. then, in summer 2020 i took a workshop in plant dyeing and dyed the whole piece with indigo.

then it sat for a while, as i wasn’t sure how to progress. the next idea was then to cover it with sashiko stitched geometric patterns, thus strengthening the fabric and keeping it from wearing out more. turns out, the fabric did only want to be stitched along the grain. so, i decided to listen and cover the whole piece in rows and rows of parallel sashiko stitching. this will take a while, but i’m not in a hurry. i stitch a few rows whenever i feel like it. whenever i come across another thinned out area, i mend it, patch it, and stitch on. i kept all the prior ideas in terms of stitching – taking out would have made the fabric deteriorate even more, and somehow i found it nice to have all stages of this project visible in some way; also visualising the way my stiching has already changed over time, and i’m sure it will keep doing so. and that’s just what learning is – practicing and having the practice change you and your work.

this is how thin the fabric is, it’s almost see-through.

a patched area:

and some mended areas that pre-date me, they already existed when i bought the pillow case; plus a hand stitched monogram. i really like finding mended areas in vintage or antique fabrics. they are traces of the textile’s story.

and a close up of the layers of sashiko stitching. the white ones were my first attempt. now the whole piece will be covered in stitches like the blue ones, in different shades of indigo dyed thread by Sashi.Co. on another note, if you want to know more about sashiko and hear the voices of japanese people who have been practicing sashiko throughout several generations, check out the instagram and youtube of atsushi from Sashi.Co (or Upcycle Stitches, which is their us website). sashiko is much more than just running stitches on fabric. there is a deep history and culture attached to sashiko, and i really recommend to get a glimpse into this world by listening and learning and not just copying a style.

yellow

recently i was gifted with a few tagetes flowers that were left since summer and still out in the winter cold. dried up and frozen over several times, i wondered if there was still any dye left in them.

tagetes erecta plant in winter

i picked the dried flower heads and took them home. to use them for dyeing, i put them in a pot with water, heated everything up and let it simmer for a while. you’re basically making tea, a very concentrated one. every once in a while i dip a piece of fabric to get an idea of the dye colour and strength.

tagetes flower head soaked in water to be heated up

once the dye is to my liking, i strain out the flower heads and let it cool down over night. as i mainly work with linen and cotton, for a dye like tagetes the fiber needs to be mordanted before dyeing, otherwise the colour will not stick to the fabric and wash out. for this i currently use an aluminium formate (aluminium triformiat, C3H3AlO6) cold mordant, which i keep in a bucket and throw threads or fabric to be dyed in there. it is really practical, as it works at room temperature, and you can leave fiber in there for a long time if you don’t want to or can’t dye them immediately.

the next step is the actual dyeing. for this i slowly heat the dye up and add the threads/fabric after taking them out of the mordant and removing any excess mordanting liquid.

threads in tagetes dye

leave the fabric or thread in the dye until the colour pleases you. it will get a little less intense after drying, so keep that in mind.

thread in tagetes dye

once you like the colour, take out your fabric or threads, squeeze excess dye (careful – hot!!!) and hang up to dry.

sashiko thread freshout of the dye bath
freshly dyed vintage cotton/linen handkerchief fabric
sashiko & cotton embroidery thread

after a while the dye bath loses its power – it will stilly dye, but the colours will be much gentler.

embroidery thread – dye bath already less intense

after your fabrics and threads are dry, wait approximately two weeks before rinsing them for the first time, this helps the colour settle and really stick to the fibers.

these are all fabrics and thread dyed with tagetes flowers from @westspacevienna roof top garden. first dye bath:

sashiko and embroidery thread
linen, cotton & cotton/linen fabric

second dye bath:

embroidery thread
embroidery thread

i’m still amazed at how much colour and vibrancy was left in these dried up, shrivelled flower heads. will definitely go hunting for dyestuff in nature in the next weeks. i guess there could be a few more happy surprises out there.

and i look very much forward to work with these materials. it’s really special to know where the plants come from and who grew them (thank you jana @netzwerkdachbesetzung & lilly @wiener_dachfarm for your generous gift of these flowers. ❤ and sandra @vermilio.vienna for helping me out with all my dyeing questions and troubleshooting). combined with vintage and antique fabric and thread i’m constantly hunting for, these will hopefully become nice and slow textile works in the near future.

plant dye

a few recent plant dyeing experiments.

purple/violet – avocado kernels with iron mordant (iron (II) acetate (basically rust in vinegar) on linen fabric and cotton embroidery floss

pink – avocado kernel on linen and cotton embroidery floss

dark brown – walnut husks on linen fabric and cotton embroidery floss

lighter brown – yellow onion skins with iron mordant on linen fabric and cotton embroidery floss

yellow – two different batches of tagetes flowers, collected in january (dried out, frozen over a few times, still on the stalks, and they still had so much colour!) on vintage handkerchiefs (cotton and linen/cotton), linen fabric, cotton embroidery floss and cotton sashiko thread

plant dyed fabrics and thread

Grain

I had forgotten how much I love the look of silver grain, the moment when you see your developed film for the first time, or even the scans. And sometimes there is the odd shot that makes my heart jump from the sheer beauty of that grain. Just the grain itself…

Both Icarex 35S with Zeiss Tessar 50/2.8 and Kodak Trix400; lab scans. Light leaks and all (or wherever this kind of streaking is coming from – hints highly appreciated), these two images make me really happy. Their beautiful grain does.

Rheindamm

A walk along the last part of the Alpine Rhine, right before it enters the Lake of Constance.

This part of the river is heavily regulated and is basically an artificial canal. The canal bed reaches far into the Lake of Constance and bends towards the west to keep the river from silting up the eastern part of the lake and eventually cutting off a part of the lake.

I think the photos date back to 2017.

Kodak Portra 160, lab scans.

Happy Mis-takes…

After I finally had gotten around to collect the few rolls of film I had shot over the last two or three years and had them developed last week, I also got back some unexpected double-exposures. I rarely bring myself around to play around with double-exposures on purpose, so when they happen by accident (= by me being sloppy with marking exposed rolls of film properly), I do enjoy them. Here are a few I cropped out of a continuous 15-frame-or-so-negative. I think these date back to summer 2016 or 2017… Not sure. North sea, Norderney.

All shot on Portra 160, lab-scanned.

Also, I just switched to wordpress block editor. If something looks dodgy in the layout, let me know. Still getting used to the new editor…