90

While digging through my archives I found these photos I took about two and a half years ago at my great uncle’s 90th birthday. I still like the series so I thought I’d put them up here. It was a lovely day with my extended family and some regional quirks.

IMG_1011blogMy sister and her partner’s daughter having fun with the camera.

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IMG_1018blogYep, got caught.

IMG_1019blogMy great uncle is very fond of music and helped founding the first music school in the area. He also always was very involved in the local brass band. I don’t know about your area, but where I come from every village has their own brass band. So the local brass band dropped by for a birthday serenade. My great uncle discussing the set with the bandmaster.

IMG_1021blogMy sister being cheeky, my great uncle listening to the music. Still can’t get over the fact that he’s 90 years old, he looks so much younger.

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IMG_1027blogLots of shake hands.

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IMG_1033blogAnd more music.

IMG_1035blogIf you make it to 90 years, you get to conduct the brass band.

IMG_1045blogEven the local police commander dropped by and brought a gift.

IMG_1046blogListening to the speech. Not easy to impress.

IMG_1047blogAnd some more music.

IMG_1051blogMy great uncle believes in the importance of kids getting in contact with music, so he was very happy about all the kids in the brass band.

IMG_1054blogMy dad discussing a piece of music with one of the brass band girls.

IMG_1057blogHaving done their duty, time for food, drinks and party. Typical brass band.

IMG_1058blogLeftovers.

IMG_1060blogI’m repeating myself – brass bands!

IMG_1065blogOne last speech (it was a very short one), and then food.

IMG_1075blogFamily time. My brother, my dad and my great uncle.

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Lovely memories of meeting my extended family. And wishing my great uncle many more happy years to come.

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Styria Colour

Finally the colour version of our holiday in Styria… Took me ages to finish the roll and have it developed.

We were surrounded by lots of green.

“Our” house.

And “our” backyard.

Vineyards and grapes everywhere, couldn’t resist to take a few snaps…

Evening view.

More grapes.

We spent a day in Graz as well. Backyard of Atelier Jungwirth.

Shadows in our hotel room.

Heading back home.

Either Kodak Portra 160 or digital.

Power

My last entry showed just a few moments of two days, where I had the opportunity to take photographs of two power stations. Both of them are combined-cycle power stations. They basically use the hot exhausts of a gas turbine, feed it into a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), which produces steam. That steam then can either be used to produce electricity, or you can use the steam for something else – like paper production, long distance heating or other technical processes that use or need steam. The gas turbine itself can also be used, alongside producing hot exhausts, to produce electricity. Well, I hope I got that technical bit right, if anyone would like to read more – here’s a link to Wikipedia: HRSG. It was really, really interesting to learn about how these power stations work and to be able to go inside and have a look at stuff you don’t usually get to see.

This is how the first one looks from the outside – actually really nice looking, not what I expected when I thought of power stations.

We started off right at the top, high up the chimney (well, almost at the top). The view was amazing, which was a good thing, as I am a bit afraid of heights, and concentrating on the magnificent view and on taking photos distracted me from thoughts about falling down…

Quite comfortable ascent – stairs!

The platform and the chimney seen from the roof.

Luckily I didn’t need to go up the last part to the real top of the chimney, I would have had to use the ladder, no stairs up there…

The inside had a few surprises for me, one of them being that it gets very warm inside (well, kind of obvious). On the highest floor the temperature is around 60┬░C. Stay for while, and you can cancel your next sauna session! Talking of floors – you won’t find first or second or third floor, have a look at this:

The height is marked in meters rather than floor numbers. So the ninth floor would be 34,75m, like you can see here:

Another thing that surprised me at 34,75m – this:

That’s a water level indicator – beautiful light!

Here a few impressions how the whole thing looked inside:

That was a tricky one, and it didn’t really work out, but you can still see the fire inside the boiler:

A few details I really liked:

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 And this was the second power station:

This power station was larger than the first one, here is a view on the two gas turbines that produce the heat.

Here how it looks from the ground, the cars give some reference size-wise.

On the roof:

Another one with one of the chimneys:

Pipes, pipes, pipes…

Couldn’t resist taking a few photos of this chimney (not part of that power station, but very close by):

And finally – the control room (well, the two pictures I liked the most of the control room). Of course there’s a modern, computer controlled room, but a few bits and pieces were still the old ones, and I liked those far more than the large screens.

And finally – me just climbing down from one of the turbines (a bit stretched and distorted, thanks wide-angle lens! Credits to Salti for this picture):

So long, hope you enjoyed my little power entry!

…and a big thank you to Salti for this opportunity!

Linocut

My boyfriend did a few linocut testprints today, for one to test the printing plate and also to test some bamboo paper to see if he wants to use it for the actual prints. Was too late to capture the whole process, but a few impressions nevertheless:

Alternative use for photobooks.

Final touches before looking at the print.

Coming off the plate.

Reviewing.

Print and plate.

Comparing.

The printing plate.

Hot Days

Summer seems to have disappeared around here, so I decided to post a few pictures I took┬á about two weeks ago while I was in Graz for two days (work related, not that you start thinking of holidays or anything). It was really hot back then and I wanted to test my new lens, thus a probably unusual/random/strange selection of pictures…

Not much you can do in a few minutes of free time in your boiling hot hotel room other than taking pictures of your feet…

Or taking pictures of your duvet in the morning just before leaving…

Looking out of my hotel room window.

Arrived early at the train station, decided to take pictures instead of trying not to sweat (which doesn’t work anyway). I quite liked the series of pictures, even though I’m not quite sure about why that is… Anyways, here you go. At least it reminds me of summer feeling as opposed to the current temperatures around here.

Imperial Funeral

On 4th of July 2011 Otto Habsburg-Lothringen, the last Crown Prince of Austria-Hungary, died at the age of 98. After a long period of mourning he was finally buried on 16th of July in the Habsburg family crypt in Vienna (Kapuzinergruft), his heart was buried one day later in Hungary.

So much for a short historic background (if you want to know more, just pay auntie google a visit!). The funeral itself seemed to become a quite strange event, at least for me. As you hopefully know, Austria has ceased to be a monarchy in 1918. The funeral was announced to be a massive event, as big as a state funeral would have been – just that it was no official state funeral. A typical Austrian solution I would say.

Even though Austria long ago ceased to be a monarchy, sometimes you get the impression that our country secretly wishes we still had “our Emperor and Empress”. Even though I am not particularly interested in monarchy, nor wish to re-install a monarchy in Austria, I thought the funeral would make an interesting opportunity to take pictures, mainly of the people attending the funeral and the funeral procession.

The day before the funeral people could pay their tribute to the body which was layed out in the church where he also was to be buried later on. The place was already prepared for the day of the funeral with big screens where documentaries were aired. As I wanted to see how the place was set up and where the barriers would be placed, I went there and snapped a few pictures.

People watching the screen.

People queuing up to pay their references.

Liked the couple dressed in black.

Fast forward to the day of the funeral. These two were trying to get pictures of the celebrities arriving for the requiem mass in St. Stephen’s cathedral. Wanna-be paprazzi kind of… Probably need to think of upgrading their equipment!

Really most of the pictures I took were people watching…

It was very hot, and the little one was completely exhausted.

Think these guys belong to the Order of Malta. They were lined up in fron of the church waiting for the procession to start.

Flag with the coat of arms of Austria (mind – republic!), on the other side a picture of Otto Habsburg-Lothringen.

A tourist reading in his city guide about Austria back in monarchy era.

He was smiling happily, having climbed the barriers to watch the big screens, holding a Sissi flyer.

Photographers.

Saw this gentleman already the day before. Amidst the crowd just looking for celebrities he seemed a bit forlorn, genuinely sad.

The programme still stated Otto Habsburg’s title from back in monarchy times (which I think he was not allowed to carry in Austria! Yes, the funeral took place in Austria, Vienna…):

S.k.u.k.H Erzherzog Otto von ├ľsterreich K├Âniglicher Prinz von Ungarn (His Imperial and Royal Highness Archduke Otto of Austria, Prince Royal of Hungary)

Also doubles up as sunshield or to cover your face in case someone takes pictures of you. Or whatever she was doing there…

One of my favourite shots.

Tired. Or bored.

Asleep.

Clearly bored. Not even Sissi was able to impress little doggy…

The crowd waiting for the procession.

The kids jumped up trying to see if the procession was already approaching.

Austrian armed forces – guard of honor (no, this was no state funeral!). They had taps fixed under their boots, which sounded quite funny, especially when looking into their stern faces. I always wonder if there’s somebody somewhere in this world who makes up all these funny ways of marching in step and then sells them to the different countries, as no one could come up by themselves with these quirky and really inefficient ways of moving yourself from one place to another… One of the reasons I could never join the army, I would constantly keel over from laughter with all the ridiculous stuff they come up with… (I know I wouldn’t, it’s not the best place to laugh… not much humor around there, they are always up to give people a hard time). Anyways – funny to watch!

Some of the traditional clubs, most of them had a hard time while trying to march in step… ­čśë

Personally I am really put off by most of these groups (“Traditionsverb├Ąnde/Tiroler Sch├╝tzen/Studentenverbindungen/etc. – sorry, I don’t know the correct translations for these), as they usually stand for really “tradional values”, some of them (not all of course) being friendly with right-wing ideas…

I literally felt sick in my stomach while they passed by… Don’t know, seeing these groups always creates a really oppressive atmosphere for me… So not many pictures of them…

Flags.

The coffin…

Action shooting.

Black & white pictures taken with Agfa APX 100 in Rodinal 1+50, all the rest digital.